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Distributed Energy Resources Integration

DER-CAM

This figure shows a high-level schematic of the energy flow typically modeled in DER-CAM. Typical energy inputs to the site are solar insolation, utility electricity, and utility natural gas. DER-CAM selects the optimal combination of utility purchases, on-site generation heat recovery, and absorption cooling, to meet the site's end-use loads at each time step at minimum overall costs.

Figure. This figure shows a high-level schematic of the energy flow typically modeled in DER-CAM. Typical energy inputs to the site are solar insolation, utility electricity, and utility natural gas. DER-CAM selects the optimal combination of utility purchases, on-site generation heat recovery, and absorption cooling, to meet the site's end-use loads at each time step at minimum overall costs.

DER-CAM has been developed for analysts of site-specific electricity and heat requirements, producing an optimal plan for on-site generation to meet customer's energy requirements. The objective of the model is to minimize the site's energy bill by installing and operating on-site generation and combined heat and power (CHP) systems, installing other equipment, e.g. photovoltaic cell, or simply buying energy over a test period. DER-CAM models individual customer sites or a Microgrid.

This economic model is unique in its ability to consider both a customer's electrical and heat energy requirements at one time in a fully technology neutral manner (looking at trade-offs, benefits, and costs), instead of an analysis of each individual component. DER-CAM chooses which distributed generation and/ or CHP technologies a customer should adopt and how that technology should be operated based on specific site load and price information, together with performance data for available equipment options.

The results of a DER-CAM analysis provide a valuable starting point for a more detailed engineering feasibility study of the optimal equipment choice, for forecasting and policy analysis.

Additional information can be found at the DER at LBNL website.

Contacts:

Chris Marnay
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
(510) 486-7028

http://certs.lbl.gov